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  • Writer's pictureWomen's Well Being Magazine

5 ways to detect breast cancer early


5 ways to detect breast cancer early

Breast cancer is a leading cause of death among women worldwide. Detecting breast cancer at an early stage significantly increases the chances of successful treatment and survival. The following five methods can help in early detection of breast cancer: 1. Self-Examination: Regular self-examination is an important tool for detecting early signs of breast cancer. Women should perform monthly breast self-exams to check for any changes in the breasts. Look for lumps, changes in size or shape, nipple discharge, or any other abnormalities. If any unusual changes are noticed, it is crucial to consult a healthcare professional promptly. 2. Clinical Breast Examination (CBE): A clinical breast examination done by a healthcare professional can aid in the early detection of breast cancer. During a CBE, a healthcare provider will examine the breasts for lumps or other abnormalities using different hand movements and pressure. It is recommended that women over the age of 20 have a CBE at least once every three years. 3. Mammography: A mammogram is an X-ray imaging test that can detect breast cancer before it is physically felt. Mammograms are typically performed every one to two years for women aged 40 and above. Women with a family history of breast cancer or other risk factors may need to start mammograms earlier and have them more frequently. Mammography can identify small tumors or micro-calcifications that may not be noticeable in a physical examination. 4. Breast MRI: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can be useful in detecting breast cancer in some high-risk women. It is usually recommended as a follow-up for women with a strong family history of breast cancer or those with certain genetic mutations. MRI can provide clearer images of breast tissue compared to mammograms, but it is more expensive and not suitable for all women. 5. Genetic Testing: Genetic testing can help identify inherited gene mutations, such as BRCA1 and BRCA2, which significantly increase the risk of breast cancer. Women with a family history of breast or ovarian cancer can undergo genetic counseling and testing to assess their risk. This information can help determine the frequency and type of screening needed to detect breast cancer at an early stage. In conclusion, early detection is crucial in the fight against breast cancer. Regular self-examination, clinical breast examinations, mammography, breast MRI, and genetic testing are all valuable tools in detecting breast cancer at its earliest and most treatable stages. Women should consult with healthcare professionals to determine the most appropriate screening methods based on their individual risk profiles.




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